Three of the panels of the great broken scripture cross at Kells. The bottom panel depicts Christ's baptism in the River Jorden with a dove, the symbol of St Columba, representing the holy spirit.

Tour Guide
Sacred Island
Carrowkeel
Summer solstice
Doonaveeragh Village
Caves of Kesh
Kesh Cairn
Knocknarea
Carrowmore
Cairns Hill
Moytura
Newgrange
Winter Solstice
Knowth
Dowth
Loughcrew
Megalithic art
The Cailleach
Cairn A
Cairn B
Cairn D
Equinox sunrise
Samhain sunrise
Tara
Fourknocks
Croagh Patrick

The monastic settlement at Kells, Co Meath

The town of Kells is well worth a visit, should you be passing near. Though there is some debate as to whether the Book of Kells, Ireland's most famous relic of the past, was written and illuminated here, the remaining crosses and round tower will transport you back to the times of St Columba, that gifted artist and visionary of the early Irish Christians.

Illuminated capital from page 16v of the Book of Kells, from Bernard Meehan's The Book of Kells.

Until recently there were four crosses at Kells - three within the Church of Ireland graveyard, near the round tower, and the Market Cross, which stood by a busy intersection in the town. However, as the Market Cross was struck by the passing traffic a few times, it has been removed by Dúchas.

The other three crosses remain in the churchyard, though only the Cross of Patrick and Columba (right, above) is complete. Another large cross is broken, and only the shaft remains (possibly due to Viking visits?). The third huge cross is very interesting, as it is undecorated and unfinished, but quite massive (Vikings again?).

Celtic chickens - a cock and his hens from page 67r from Bernard Meehan's The Book of Kells.

 

Three of the panels of the great broken scripture cross at Kells. The bottom panel depicts Christ's baptism in the River Jorden with a dove, the symbol of St Columba, representing the holy spirit.